Why Is Questioning Equal To Hate?

I had a pretty strong response to my last post from a good, dear friend of mine. He strongly disagreed with the article I linked to. He, of course, has every right to disagree and I never expect everyone to agree with everything I say or reference.

One thing that he said really startled me. He said, “If you hate God that is your business and between you and him.”

I never once said, or even implied in that or any other post I’ve written that I hate God, which is why I was so startled by his comment.

I replied that I don’t hate God, but I do hate religion because I believe it drives a wedge between people for no valid reason. We are all different and we have different beliefs and world views, but that doesn’t mean we can’t get along. Using the concept that people who don’t believe like us are evil serves no purpose and only leads to violence, suffering and death.

I am not at all naive to believe that we can all live in peace and harmony, as nice as that would be, but I certainly think that we can, should, and for the most part, do tolerate each other. It isn’t necessary to think or believe alike in order to coexist. We’ve been doing it for centuries, otherwise there would only be one homogeneous group of humans on earth, all believing the exact same thing. The fact that this isn’t the case shows that we have learned, for the most part, that it is best for our long term survival to try to get along with other groups of people even if we don’t agree with or like them. We can even hate them and still coexist. That’s why we have fences, and borders and treaties, and militaries to support those treaties and keep the peace.

What really struck me most about his comment is the assumption that because I linked to an article that was critical of Christianity that I must somehow hate God.

The reason I made that article the focus of my blog entry was that I believe that we need to question fundamental beliefs when those beliefs are the cause of suffering, pain and death, or in any way has a negative impact on people. Questioning these beliefs doesn’t make them wrong, but it should make us stop and think about what the effect of these beliefs are. To blindly believe in something that causes harm to another is not just callous, but morally wrong unless it can be rationally justified based on the idea that we all have the inalienable right to life, liberty the the pursuit of happiness.

To question assumptions, beliefs and ideas is critical because otherwise we are left with a jumble of misunderstandings, contradictions, and fears that can only serve to divide and destroy us. And to assume that someone hates your or your God because you dare to question their beliefs or actions is unfair, reactionary and can only lead to more misunderstanding and hatred.

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6 thoughts on “Why Is Questioning Equal To Hate?

  1. You seem like a smart and nice person. And I basically agree with you here.

    But let’s face it: Zionists, Dominionists, and American Evangelicals are NEVER going to accept anything less than an all-out war to obliterate Palestine in order to let the Jews “return home” so they can rebuild on the Temple Mount so that THEN Christ can return, yadda yadda. I wish it weren’t true. But this particular worldview admits no compromise, and no compassion for those who would defy the will of the Lord: i.e. the diplomats and peacemakers. It is, in fact, an Old-Testament worldview, which is why the original essay you linked to is so salient and resonant, and also why Francis Schaeffer has been sounding the alarm since the ’90s.

    “We are all different and we have different beliefs and world views, but that doesn’t mean we can’t get along.”
    No offense, seriously, but … yes, actually, it DOES mean that we can’t, or won’t, get along. Tolerance is highly over-rated, in my opinion; it’s what you do until you can get your way. And some worldviews (see above) have a built-in inoculation against tolerance and compromise; they actually see compromise and diplomacy as a genuine evil, a tool of Satan.

    “Using the concept that people who don’t believe like us are evil serves no purpose…”
    Right. Unless your worldview tells you that it DOES serve a purpose, and that it’s a Higher Purpose, beyond this world and this life…”and only leads to violence, suffering and death.” Fair enough. But what if that IS the purpose? You must keep in mind that for the True Believer, this life, its attendant suffering, and death are all but momentary obstacles to an eternity in Paradise.

    “To blindly believe in something that causes harm to another is not just callous, but morally wrong unless it can be rationally justified based on the idea that we all have the inalienable right to life, liberty the the pursuit of happiness.”
    And here you give the game away: this is an essentially enlightenment/humanist worldview, and the religious fundamentalist has no room for it.

    I’m with you all the way, man. But sometimes you really have to face up to what’s in front of you, and realize that it won’t be reasoned away.

  2. *nod* And agrees with the previous comment.

    There is a reason I say that I’m a “misoideatheist…but the operative part is…” (*grin*)

    Coexistence is necessary…but like the commenter above noted, there are those who want to see the crusades revived.

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